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Perhaps one word or phrase where you come from might have another meaning where I come from?

Post examples below and lets find out some fun trivia about where we come from :)

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For example:

If I was having a Pot luck dinner at my house I would ask my friends and family to "bring a plate" - this doesn't mean an empty plate its a plate with some food on it for every one to share.

and from my understanding in the Good old USA a "biscuit" is what I would call a "Scone"

In the summer time I like to wear Jandals, you might know them as "Flip Flops"

I know Jandals and Flip Flops as thongs

hmmm Well Bring a plate is also used in Australia, not sure about the scone thing? we have scones, what are your scones like? haha

um, well I'm fairly certain this is Australian - see if I was going swimming I would wear my togs... you would call them a bathing suit.

There's one that I didn't know was Aussie until recently, so correct me if I'm wrong, but we use the nickname "Chrissy" for Christmas.

OH and also, throw another shrimp on the Barbie? I think not! okay, to clear up this often used phrase... We don't call them shrimps... ever... at all... they're prawns! prawns people! (I knwo no one mentioned this, but I was talking about it with friends tonight and It came to mind) ;D

I'm sure there are heaps, but oh well! this will do!
he he! well we are very similar after all I can even make a sentence!

I'll bring a plate to your Chrissy barbie, I hope that you'll have prawns, can I bring my togs to have a swim after lunch?

If I was lucky enough to own a small beach house I would call that a "Batch' or if I was from the south Island i might call it a "crib".

we call a faucet a tap.

If I was in a cafe and ordering a coffee I would ask for it to be "trim" if I wanted low fat milk.
A small segment from the North East England phrase book:

Whats the crack like? (what is going on)
I had a blag of the bandit and lost a tenner. (I tried my luck on the fruit machine and lost ten pound)
You wanna go like? (Sir if you are not careful, I will fight you)

You see, up north, we're a lot more common, and don't speak as posh.

Also I'd like to question a popular misconception I've seen on American programs. Warm lager :S. Never seen it before, we like our lager chilled. Our ales are kept at a warmer temperature however so it's probably where it comes from.
Well, in the States they call toques, beanies. Well here in Canada we call them Toques.

uhhh We don't say Aboot like everyone thinks we do. We say About.

That's really all I can think off.

unless someone is from way east, they speak real funny there. I thought it would be fun to have someone from the deep south try and converse with a Newfoundlander. lol that'd be a REAL laugh

Well, we have... never mind, I'm not going to get started.
In Canada, we say lieutenant "leftenant", which honestly makes no sense to me, but that's what people say.
We also say roof with a long "oooo" sound, unlike some Americans.
This isn't really completely Canadian, but we turn a lot of "t" sounds into "d" sounds, like waderboddle and Oddawa, instead of waterbottle and Ottawa.
Canadians used to say the word kahki like "carkey", but not so much anymore... again, this is another one that makes no sense.
People in Saskatchewan call a hoodie a "bunny hug", and people would also call a hoodie a "kangaroo jacket".
Gonch means underwear.
Chesterfield is the traditional word for couch or sofa, but most people in Canada just say couch now.
We use "loonies", which are our one dollar coins. We also use "toonies", which are our two dollar coins.
Americans call "back bacon" Canadian bacon.
A double-double is is a coffee with two creams and two sugars (used at Tim Horton's, our original Canadian coffe shop).
We use the phrase "eh" to mean everything from a question ending (it's cold out, eh?) to a "huh?" to an agreement.
We started up the use of "hoser" (look up Bob and Doug Mckenzie on youtube).
An "Islander" refers to either someone from Vancouver Island (BC) or someone from the province of PEI (Prince Edward Island), depending on where you are in the country.
We have postal codes, not zip codes.

That's everything I can think of. :D

Interesting! I'm north of Detroit and pronounce roof as r00-f and all the t's as d's the same as canadians. Guess we are close enough in location to share a few strategies.

Well, cause of a certain advert most people greet each other as "righ' boi" or "righ' bird" and people will shout "GREEN ARMY!" If devon is ever brought up in a conversation. The power of advertisment :) Xx^_^
Crack? Don't you mean Craic!
Sorry, Northern Ireland are very protective of that particular spelling haha

Dan Kossick said:
A small segment from the North East England phrase book:

Whats the crack like? (what is going on)
I had a blag of the bandit and lost a tenner. (I tried my luck on the fruit machine and lost ten pound)
You wanna go like? (Sir if you are not careful, I will fight you)

You see, up north, we're a lot more common, and don't speak as posh.

Also I'd like to question a popular misconception I've seen on American programs. Warm lager :S. Never seen it before, we like our lager chilled. Our ales are kept at a warmer temperature however so it's probably where it comes from.

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Created by Link (Chiasquatch) Jan 18, 2011 at 10:17am. Last updated by Gumbo123 Jan 6.

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